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Wed, Nov 30, 2011

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#TNL: Recruiting in the Sausage Grinder

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I was born and raised on the Northwest side of Chicago.  I’m supposed to be an expert in meat in a tube—along with The Cubs, Michael Jordan, and Al Capone—but I chose a different path. I am a Human Resources consultant.

I should have picked sausage.

So it makes sense that I was asked to host the upcoming #TNL National Recruiting Conference on December 5 in Aurora, Illinois (famous for being the setting for the cinematic classic that is Wayne’s World).

If you’re an HR or talent management practitioner, it’s going to be, to quote Aurora’s most famous residents, party time and maybe even excellent.

#TNL is an amazing conference with a mash-up of speakers, analysts and practitioners discussing real issues that matter to real recruiters.

Since I’m rocking the mic as the event’s emcee, here are some of the speakers and sessions I’m most excited about (and you should be too):

The day kicks off with a keynote from Bruce Morton, Allegis Group Services’ Chief Marketing Officer.  Morton has traveled all over the globe to talk about his fresh and inspiring approach to recruiting and retention. It’s a rare “influencer” or “thought leader” who has actually rolled up his sleeves and done many of the things he is proposing.

Morton is one of a rare breed who’s actually designed, implemented and managed some of the largest resourcing solutions (that’s consultant speak for ‘outsourcing’) around the world. He has secured top talent while saving companies millions of dollars.

Finding better talent without spending a ton of money sounds pretty good to most HR professionals. I know I’ll be paying attention to the secrets of Morton’s success, because that’s kind of the entire point of recruitment.

The conference continues with an all-star cast. Yes, I used the word all-star to describe recruiting. I am a dork.

Expect great sessions from industry influencers like John Sumser (the man, the myth and the legend), global sourcing leaders like Raytheon’s Marianthe Verver, and corporate talent practitioners like Lars Schmidt, the VP of Talent Acquisition at National Public Radio.

Lars will be speaking about talent communities with Kevin W. Grossman, Matt Charney and Maren Hogan.

What’s a talent community? It must be an important concept because it’s on Wikipedia.

“A talent community is a method of social recruiting, by relying on the collection of social cliques (or talent networks) of people that are part of the job seeking process. These people may be seeking a job themselves, offering career advice to others, recruitment professionals, college campus recruiters, sourcers, and friends seeking jobs or advice. Talent communities operate through two-way interaction between community members.” – Wikipedia

Does it sound like a hippie collective? It’s not. I swear. Lars will take us through the concept of talent communities. I trust him because he’s a fantastic guy and he was able to enlist the help of his social network to raise funds to fight prostate cancer.

Obviously he knows something about the power of community.

Unfortunately, Lars is shaving his ‘stash before the event, but he’ll still be highlighting some of the things he’s doing to showcase NPR’s company culture and engage the most important talent community of all – current employees.

Also on the agenda are speakers like Craig Fisher (that’s @fishdogs on Twitter) and Amber Osborne (better known as ‘Ms. Destructo’), who will be presenting on using location-based services for recruiting.

Expect great sessions as well from Veronica Ludwig, Elizabeth Lali-Reese, Crystal Miller, Paul Smith, Michael Beygelman and Sarah White.

If you’re still reading this, you must be somewhat interested.  Check out the agenda online and session descriptions for yourself.

The conference concludes with a final keynote from Ajax Social Media’s Jason Seiden, a noted blogger who will discuss the benefits and risks of joining social networks as well as the implications for candidates, recruiters, and HR professionals of mixing personal and professional information online.

Seiden will also discuss what it means when strangers—job seekers, parents, acquaintances, HR ladies—find each other online and start getting real. Just like MTV back in the 90s.

While Seiden may be warning us all about the risks of mixing business with pleasure, I am looking forward to doing just that at #TNL in the company of a very talented, very smart community of recruiting and HR practitioners…my kind of people.

Hope to see you in Chicago!

Monster is proud to support TalentNet Live (#TNL), an event for talent managers and human capital leaders featuring some of the brightest minds and biggest innovations in the HR industry and continuing the conversation – and learning – for practitioners around topics like social media, social recruiting and HR training.

Check MonsterThinking.com all week as we preview some of the ideas and innovations from #TNL track leaders and attendees.

About the Author:

With over a decade of Human Resources experience in Fortune 500 organizations, Laurie Ruettimann is an influential speaker, writer and social media expert who now works with The Starr Conspiracy.

In addition to creating Punk Rock HR, which was recognized by Forbes as one of the Top 100 blogs for women, Ruettimann was the co-founder of several HR start-ups including New Media Services LLC and HRM Today — the first social network for HR professionals.

She is a columnist for The Conference Board Review, an advisor to SmartBrief, and her advice has been featured in various publications such as The New York TimesForbesU.S. News & World ReportCFO magazineShape Magazine, and Men’s Health.

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  • Kelvin

    Highly interesting post. This is a very entertaining post. I look forward to see even more in the near future.

  • Pauline Dammad

    In my view, people today (meaning most IT professionals) don’t seem to know the location where the job opportunities of the future are going to originate from. We’ve left the Information Age and moved into the Information Overload Age. The up coming wave of jobs will likely be focused on solving that dilemna by turning the information into knowledge – otherwise, the information is useless. Think about it, we have been producing such an abundance of information right this moment that human beings lost the ability to keep up with it some time ago. Systems (can you say “AI”?) will have to make this happen for us. If you wish to experience the up coming IT wave, I’d focus on artificial intelligence. Views anybody?